SSHFS: Securely Access a Remote Filesystem

May 18, 2009

Once again, I find myself singing the praises of SSH. Seriously, is there much of a reason to have any other ports open anymore? The latest trick I have added to my list of things SSH can do is presenting a remote filesystem, securely.  Now, I’m sure most of us are aware that you can transfer files over SSH using a protocol called SFTP. What you may or may not be aware is that you can mount this remote filesystem locally using a nifty little tool called SSHFS. This is incredibly useful in a number of situations, allowing you to access remote files in a way that is easy for the user (as easy as local filesystems), easier to set up than solutions such as NFS, and as secure as SSH itself.

All you have to do on the remote machine you wish to access is have OpenSSH listening somewhere. For the client machine, you need to make sure you have SSHFS installed. To do this on Ubuntu, simply run:

sudo apt-get install sshfs

Now, to mount the filesystem locally, we first need to create a mount point for the filesystem:

mkdir /path/to/mountpoint
chown user /path/to/mountpoint

Where user is your username and sshfs is the location of the mountpoint. Now, to go ahead and mount the remote filesystem, simply execute this command with your own information inserted:

sshfs remote-username@address.of.server:/remote/folder/to/mount /path/to/mountpoint

Enter your password, and that’s it! Your remote filesystem should now be mounted.

Well that’s pretty cool in itself, but what if we want to go farther and have it mount at startup without any interaction from us? No problem, thanks to another cool feature of SSH called public key authentication. This feature allows us to log in to a system without providing the password of the user we are authenticating as, and instead authenticating users based on their RSA keys. If you trust me that this is secure, you can skip the next paragraph, but if you don’t, or you are curious how this works, read on.

The initial key exchange that SSH does is encrypted using an asymmetric encryption algorithm called RSA. In this key exchange, the goal is to exchange a symmetric key (AES, DES, whatever  you want) over RSA, which is unfortunately too slow to handle the large amount of data that needs to be encrypted to secure all of the SSH traffic. It is ideal, however, for assuring that a key exchange stays secure. The way it works is that each participant, both client and server, have a public key and a private key, and you give out the public key to anyone you want to be able to send you data. Once encrypted with the public key, the only way you can decrypt the data is with the private key, which only the local computer has. This technique has the useful property of providing both confidentiality and, as long as the private key is kept secret, authenticity. This means that as long as the private key is kept secret, you can authenticate to a system based solely on the public key, because no one but the authorized machine should be able to decrypt the proper symmetric key if it does not have the private key. If you would like more explanation than the incredibly brief overview I just gave, go check out the Wikipedia articles on RSA and on SSH, it should give you all the information you want.

Now that you don’t feel like you’re doing something incredibly dangerous (or maybe you still do, and you just like danger…:P ), follow these steps provided by OpenSSH on how to set up public key authentication between two hosts.  Once done, all that’s left to do is add the sshfs command that we used earlier to mount the remote filesystem to a startup script somewhere. To do this in Ubuntu/GNOME, you can simply go to System->Preferences->Startup Applications and add a new entry that uses our command from earlier as the command to be executed at login. If you are not on Ubuntu or using GNOME, you should be able to find documentation somewhere on how to make something run on startup.

That’s all there is too it, hope someone finds it useful. Just a short note, if you need to unmount the share, simply execute sudo umount /path/to/mountpoint and you’ll be fine. Enjoy!

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One Response to “SSHFS: Securely Access a Remote Filesystem”

  1. Diana Says:

    This info was very useful to me, thanks for the post. I was trying to mount the remote ssh folder with “mount” using cifs and smbfs, and always ended up with “mount error 13 = Permission denied” errors. SSHFS worked great for me.
    Thanks again!


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